International Owl Awareness Day

»»International Owl Awareness Day

Owls are intriguing birds that easily capture the attention and curiosity of birders. The owl is one of the species of birds that you do don’t see very often though, but only hear. This is due to the fact that the owl isn’t a bird that is out during the day. They are known to be very active at night only. There are two main categories of owls – barn owls and typical owls. Owls are fascinating to observe due to their behaviors. They are almost always found living alone. They may form a pair though or a small flock in some locations but it is very unusual. In areas where their natural habitat continues to get smaller though it is becoming more common. These 10 facts may help clear up a bit of their mystery and reveal what a hoot owls really are on this day of awareness:

  1. Many owl species have asymmetrical ears. When located at different heights on the owl’s head, their ears are able to pinpoint the location of sounds in multiple dimensions. Ready, aim, strike.
  2. The eyes of an owl are not true “eyeballs.” Their tube-shaped eyes are completely immobile, providing binocular vision which fully focuses on their prey and boosts depth perception.
  3. Owls can rotate their necks 270 degrees. A blood-pooling system collects blood to power their brains and eyes when neck movement cuts off circulation.
  4. A group of owls is called a parliament. This originates from C.S. Lewis’ description of a meeting of owls in The Chronicles of Narnia.
  5. Owls hunt other owls. Great Horned Owls are the top predator of the smaller Barred Owl.
  6. The Northern Hawk Owl can detect—primarily by sight—a vole to eat up to a half a mile away.
  7. In fat years when mice are plentiful, usually monogamous Boreal Owls are apt to be promiscuous. Because easy prey means less work for parents feeding their young, males have been caught mating with up to three females, while females have been seen with at least one beau on the side.
  8. Barn Owls swallow their prey whole—skin, bones, and all—and they eat up to 1,000 mice each year.
  9. Northern Saw-whet Owls can travel long distances over large bodies of water. One showed up 70 miles from shore near Montauk, New York.
  10. The tiniest owl in the world is the Elf Owl, which is 5 – 6 inches tall and weighs about 1 ½ ounces. The largest North American owl, in appearance, is the Great Gray Owl, which is up to 32 inches tall.

          

By | 2017-08-07T20:38:11+00:00 August 4, 2017|Categories: , , |0 Comments

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Recent Texas Tech graduate with a Bachelors in public relations. Ashley enjoys writing, creating graphics and watching funny puppy videos with her cat, Bill.

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